Pediatric Dentistry

Learn How To Prevent Childhood Cavities

A person’s mouth is naturally protected by saliva which has minerals that help prevent cavities, the continuous flow of saliva also helps to keep teeth clean. This is also true for children. When your child consumes a lot of starches or sugars, however, they combine with the bacteria in your mouth and create acids that [...]

By | February 5th, 2018|Pediatric Dentistry|0 Comments

Getting Ready for Your Child’s Cavity Filling

Dental appointments are often scary for many kids, particularly when they need to go for a cavity filling. Here are some tips from pediatric dental professionals on getting your child through the procedure: Answer questions - If your child asks about what will happen during the procedure, you should provide some honest details: tell them [...]

By | January 10th, 2018|Pediatric Dentistry|0 Comments

Your Child’s First Dental Visit – What to Expect

New parents often wonder when to schedule their child’s first dental appointment It is recommended that your child has their first dental visit by their first birthday. Many parents are surprised that such early dental visits are recommended. However, studies have shown that preschool-aged children are developing more cavities in their teeth. Over 1 in [...]

By | December 28th, 2017|Pediatric Dentistry|0 Comments

How to pick a pediatric dentist for your child

Whether your child has only a few newly-sprouted teeth or already has a mouthful of permanent adult teeth, routine dental care with a dentist your child is comfortable with is crucial. This helps ensure that he or she maintains healthy teeth and gums during their growth. When choosing your child's pediatric dentist, you'll want to [...]

By | December 28th, 2017|Pediatric Dentistry|0 Comments

The Pediatric Dentist and the New Dental Home

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recommend that every child be seen by a pediatric dentist by age one. It also encourages parents and other care providers to help every child establish a dental home by this age as well. The AAPD modeled the concept of the Dental Home based on the current Medical Home concept in Pediatric Medicine.

By | February 1st, 2017|Pediatric Dentistry|Comments Off on The Pediatric Dentist and the New Dental Home

Canker Sores- What are they, and why does my child get them?

Also known as aphthous ulcers, canker sores are small sores that can occur inside the mouth, cheeks, lips, throat, or sometimes on the tongue. Canker sores shouldn’t be confused, however, with cold sores or fever blisters, which are sores that are caused by the herpes simplex virus and are found outside the mouth around the lips, on the cheeks or chin, or inside the nostrils. Whereas cold sores are contagious, canker sores are not contagious — so kissing cannot spread them.

At a different time we will certainly discuss all issues concerning sores that are caused by the herpes simplex virus. However, if your child was diagnosed by your pediatric dentist or pediatrician with canker sores, you should definitely read the following.

Although canker sores aren’t contagious, the tendency to have outbreaks of canker sores can run in a family. If you’re prone to canker sores, your child has a 90% chance of getting them as well. If both parents are prone, unfortunately your child is even more prone. Although we don’t know exactly what causes canker sores, many factors are thought to put your child at risk.

Diet may be a factor. Children who have nutritional deficiencies of folic acid, vitamin B12, and iron seem to develop canker sores more often. Also, children with some food allergies are prone as well. Canker sores may also indicate that a child has an immune system problem.

Mouth injuries, such as biting the inside of your lip or even brushing too hard and damaging the delicate lining inside the mouth, also seem to bring on canker sores. Even emotional stress seems to be a factor. It’s always hard to imagine what kind of stress your three or four year old child may have; however, little stress can also go a long way with young children. One study of college students showed that they had more canker sores during stressful periods, such as around exam time, than they did during less stressful times, such as summer break.

Although anyone can get them, young people in their teens and early twenties seem to get those most often, and females are twice as likely to develop them as males. Some girls and women find that they get canker sores at the start of their menstrual periods.

By | September 9th, 2016|Pediatric Dentistry|Comments Off on Canker Sores- What are they, and why does my child get them?